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Stones

By onezero on January 21, 2018 7:50 pm

A semi-organic piece that emerged late in the week. I started with a 909 drum rack that was fairly fast, added some percussion and handclaps, and...it was too busy. Slowing it way down and adding some delay to the percussion and claps made it a bit more interesting.  Following on from last week, I figured I'd try to keep it to relatively few tracks, and ended up with 9 total, one of which (grand piano) I didn't use in the final mix, though some of the lines went to the electric piano track.


Lot of drums here: 909 kit (parallel high-pass auto-filter on the kick to boost resonance and beater tone, and high-pass auto-filter on the hat to cut out some annoying frequencies).  This kit went to a studio-room convolution reverb, with high-pass auto-filter in front of it to roll off the lows.  Also impulse hand claps (going to a delay), impulse congas (same), drum rack with just a Kawai K3M kick in it, drum rack of other percussion (also going to a delay).  Tonal instruments:  electric bass (Epi P-J) with EQ-8 to notch out the kick frequencies, and a lot of send to a studio room ambience convolution reverb (with a high-pass in front of it to keep it from booming). A briefly-used staccato analog synth voice, and Electric for electric piano.


Sends: two convolution reverbs, simple delay, and filter delay. Full-chain master on everything, but with the compression off--it was pumping too hard, and I just wanted limiting.


Title from lithium, element 3.

This submission is licensed by author under Copyright All rights reserved

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January 22, 2018 1:56 am

can you please explain the hipass filter to me - i was messing with one on my track last week - i'm not sure what it's doing...

this piece turned out really nice

January 22, 2018 2:27 am
kaedo sevaada wrote:

can you please explain the hipass filter to me - i was messing with one on my track last week - i'm not sure what it's doing...

this piece turned out really nice

Thank you, Emily!  (Nice lithium!)

In general, the point of the high-pass filter is to allow frequencies above a certain point (the cutoff) to pass through, while frequencies below the cutoff don't pass through--like turning the bass down, or the treble up.  Generally the cutoff is fairly gentle--from that frequency and up, the signal gets louder gradually, but if you increase the resonant feedback, you get a more rapid volume increase as the frequencies ascend above the cutoff point.  If you turn up the resonance enough, the frequencies just above the cutoff point can be amplified significantly.

I use the high-pass for a few different things, depending on the instrument or where the signal's going.  For kick drum, I'll put on two parallel audio effects chains in Ableton Live, with two parallel signal paths, both with high-pass filters, both with high resonant peaks (for that significant amplification of certain frequencies).  I'm looking to amplify the note of the kick, but also a higher harmonic that marks the "beater" frequency.  I'll find these by sweeping the cutoff point around, looking for where the kick gets loudest, and where it sounds good.  You can also see these points with a spectrum analyzer plugin, but I find it easier to do it by ear.

That low note--the "shell" of the kick--I also remember that frequency and go over to the channel with electric bass, and I'll use Live's EQ-8 to notch out that frequency from the bass guitar.  That kind of keeps them out of each other's way.

On reverb send, I'm looking to roll off frequencies below 100Hz, give or take some, to avoid boomy sounds as the low frequencies go into the reverb.

It seems like low frequencies build up in a more troubling way than high ones, and maybe that's related to the way octaves are doubles of frequencies--55 to 110 is just 55 different whole numbers, but the next octave up (110-220) is twice as many, so there's more frequency real estate per octave.  So I mostly use high-passes a lot to get instruments out of each other's way in the low frequency range. 

I dunno, does that make a kind of sense?

January 22, 2018 4:50 am

Chilled groove. Nice track

January 22, 2018 8:46 pm

Great production again. Nice and smooth and tasty ethno-funk.

January 23, 2018 1:32 am

Punchy and dramatic. Nice.

I use high pass filters as well, mostly to clarify vocals.

January 23, 2018 11:09 am

Groovy and chill smile I like it.

January 24, 2018 4:52 am

There is a lot of great clarity on your bass.  But still a lot of low end.  Nicely done.

January 24, 2018 10:10 am

Great track, very organic and a clear mix (from what I can hear through these laptop speakers). I'm a sucker for smooth jazz chords over a such chill bass line.

January 25, 2018 2:22 am
onezero wrote:
kaedo sevaada wrote:

can you please explain the hipass filter to me - i was messing with one on my track last week - i'm not sure what it's doing...

this piece turned out really nice

Thank you, Emily!  (Nice lithium!)

In general, the point of the high-pass filter is to allow frequencies above a certain point (the cutoff) to pass through, while frequencies below the cutoff don't pass through--like turning the bass down, or the treble up.  Generally the cutoff is fairly gentle--from that frequency and up, the signal gets louder gradually, but if you increase the resonant feedback, you get a more rapid volume increase as the frequencies ascend above the cutoff point.  If you turn up the resonance enough, the frequencies just above the cutoff point can be amplified significantly.

I use the high-pass for a few different things, depending on the instrument or where the signal's going.  For kick drum, I'll put on two parallel audio effects chains in Ableton Live, with two parallel signal paths, both with high-pass filters, both with high resonant peaks (for that significant amplification of certain frequencies).  I'm looking to amplify the note of the kick, but also a higher harmonic that marks the "beater" frequency.  I'll find these by sweeping the cutoff point around, looking for where the kick gets loudest, and where it sounds good.  You can also see these points with a spectrum analyzer plugin, but I find it easier to do it by ear.

That low note--the "shell" of the kick--I also remember that frequency and go over to the channel with electric bass, and I'll use Live's EQ-8 to notch out that frequency from the bass guitar.  That kind of keeps them out of each other's way.

On reverb send, I'm looking to roll off frequencies below 100Hz, give or take some, to avoid boomy sounds as the low frequencies go into the reverb.

It seems like low frequencies build up in a more troubling way than high ones, and maybe that's related to the way octaves are doubles of frequencies--55 to 110 is just 55 different whole numbers, but the next octave up (110-220) is twice as many, so there's more frequency real estate per octave.  So I mostly use high-passes a lot to get instruments out of each other's way in the low frequency range. 

I dunno, does that make a kind of sense?

it does (as much as i can comprehend right now) you are so good at explaining this stuff... i think this actually helped me fix some issues i was having on my mix for week 4 - i'm struggling to get the vocals recorded with the laptop mic now that we are in a carpeted space... the wood floors in the old house just bounced the sound around so nicely that the laptop mic was all i really needed... it might be time to start borrowing josh's recording mic... 

January 25, 2018 2:34 am
onezero wrote:
kaedo sevaada wrote:

can you please explain the hipass filter to me - i was messing with one on my track last week - i'm not sure what it's doing...

this piece turned out really nice

Thank you, Emily!  (Nice lithium!)

In general, the point of the high-pass filter is to allow frequencies above a certain point (the cutoff) to pass through, while frequencies below the cutoff don't pass through--like turning the bass down, or the treble up.  Generally the cutoff is fairly gentle--from that frequency and up, the signal gets louder gradually, but if you increase the resonant feedback, you get a more rapid volume increase as the frequencies ascend above the cutoff point.  If you turn up the resonance enough, the frequencies just above the cutoff point can be amplified significantly.




I use the high-pass for a few different things, depending on the instrument or where the signal's going.  For kick drum, I'll put on two parallel audio effects chains in Ableton Live, with two parallel signal paths, both with high-pass filters, both with high resonant peaks (for that significant amplification of certain frequencies).  I'm looking to amplify the note of the kick, but also a higher harmonic that marks the "beater" frequency.  I'll find these by sweeping the cutoff point around, looking for where the kick gets loudest, and where it sounds good.  You can also see these points with a spectrum analyzer plugin, but I find it easier to do it by ear.

That low note--the "shell" of the kick--I also remember that frequency and go over to the channel with electric bass, and I'll use Live's EQ-8 to notch out that frequency from the bass guitar.  That kind of keeps them out of each other's way.

On reverb send, I'm looking to roll off frequencies below 100Hz, give or take some, to avoid boomy sounds as the low frequencies go into the reverb.

It seems like low frequencies build up in a more troubling way than high ones, and maybe that's related to the way octaves are doubles of frequencies--55 to 110 is just 55 different whole numbers, but the next octave up (110-220) is twice as many, so there's more frequency real estate per octave.  So I mostly use high-passes a lot to get instruments out of each other's way in the low frequency range. 

I dunno, does that make a kind of sense?

Sort of - I wish I could see it visually drawn out - you are so good at explaining this stuff!  Thank you!

January 26, 2018 9:50 am

welcome back smile c

January 26, 2018 4:52 pm

Love the groove it's got going.

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